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Content of Asthmagen Natural Rubber Latex Allergens in Commercial Disposable Gloves.

Posted by on in 2016
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Bittner C1Garrido MV2Krach LH2Harth V22016. Adv Exp Med Biol. 921:37-44. doi: 10.1007/5584_2016_227.
1Division of Clinical Occupational Medicine, Institute for Occupational and Maritime Medicine (ZfAM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 10 Seewartenstraße, 20459, Hamburg, Germany. cordula.bittner@bgv.hamburg.de.
2Division of Clinical Occupational Medicine, Institute for Occupational and Maritime Medicine (ZfAM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 10 Seewartenstraße, 20459, Hamburg, Germany.

Abstract

The use of natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves in many occupations may lead to latex sensitization, allergic asthma, and skin reactions. Due to their good properties and environmental safety NRL gloves are still being used in the healthcare setting, but also in the food industry, by hairdressers, cleaners, etc. The aim of our study was to assess the protein and NRL allergen content in commercial gloves by different methods, including a new assay. Twenty commercially available NRL gloves were analyzed. Protein extraction was performed according to the international standard ASTM D-5712. Total protein content was measured with a modified Lowry method, NRL content with the CAP Inhibition Assay, the Beezhold ELISA Inhibition Assay, and an innovative ELISA with IgY-antibodies extracted from eggs of NRL-immunized hens (IgY Inhibition Assay). We found a high protein content in a range of 215.0-1304.7 μg/g in 8 out of the 20 NRL gloves. Seven of the 20 gloves were powdered, four of them with a high protein content. In gloves with high protein content, the immunological tests detected congruently high levels of NRL allergen. We conclude that a high percentage of commercially available NRL gloves still represent a risk for NRL allergy, including asthma. The modified Lowry Method allows to infer on the latex allergen content.

KEYWORDS:

IgY inhibition assay; IgY-antibodies; Latex allergy; Latex gloves

PMID:
 
27241513
 
DOI:
 
10.1007/5584_2016_227
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